Difference between revisions of "Kinect Sensor Mount"

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== Author ==
 
== Author ==
Marc Killpack, Advisor: Prof. Charlie Kemp
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Marc Killpack (http://www.prism.gatech.edu/~mkillpack3, mkillpack3_at_gatech.edu), Advisor: Prof. Charlie Kemp
  
Check back soon for pictures and solid works files showing the Kinect mount we've used on three of our robots.
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== Use ==
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After some basic steps to disassemble the base of the Kinect, we can use the mount described here to attach the Kinect sensor to a robot or other fixture (see examples below from HRL).  If the intended purpose is for static use, there is a shaft that allows you to orient the Kinect plus or minus 30 degrees.  If the purpose is to attach the Kinect to a moving part/robot, then we recommend the use of the supports as seen below in the instructions.  We developed this as an alternative to having to open up the actual sensor casing and use its screw holes.
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== Making the Kinect Mount ==
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We used a 3D printer to make our mount out of ABS plastic.  The same parts could be machined out of metal if desired but would likely require some modifications to the tolerances and the thicknesses of some parts.  The following sections list the necessary parts and explain the basic assembly of the mount from start to finish.
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== Solid Works Files ==
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The main solid works files necessary for the mount are as follows:
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*[[Media:Top_gen.SLDPRT|top_piece]], [[Media:Bottom_gen.SLDPRT|base_piece]], [[Media:Crank_gen.SLDPRT|crank]], [[Media:Shaft_gen.SLDPRT|shaft]], [[Media:Support_gen.SLDPRT|support]]
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<gallery caption="Solid Works Parts" widths="200px" perrow="5">
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File:Top.png|top
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File:Base.png|base
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File:Crank.png|crank
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File:Shaft.png|shaft
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File:Support.png|support x 2
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</gallery>
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The following files are examples of how we have modified the original to work for our robots:
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*[[Media:Top_pr2.SLDPRT|pr2_top]], [[Media:Bottom_pr2.SLDPRT|pr2_base]], [[Media:Top_cody.SLDPRT|cody_top_side_mount]], [[Media:Bottom_cody.SLDPRT|cody_base_side_mount]], [[Media:Top_cody2.SLDPRT|cody_top_under_mount]], [[Media:Bottom_cody2.SLDPRT|cody_base_under_mount]], [[Media:Bottom_playpen.SLDPRT|playpen_base]]
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== Steps to Disassemble Kinect Base and Attach New Mount ==
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<gallery caption="Steps for Mounting Kinect" widths="400px" perrow="3">
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File:Kinect mount16.jpg|Necessary tools for the job: size T0 bit, small phillips and flat screwdriver, larger screwdriver for the T0 bit, heavy duty shears, needle nose pliers.  You may also want a size M4 and M3 tap for threading the plastic mount.
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File:Kinect_mount_threading.jpg| After printing the mount, it is helpful to assemble the [[Media:Top_gen.SLDPRT|top]] and [[Media:Bottom_gen.SLDPRT|base]] pieces and thread them with an M4 size tap.  If you are using the [[Media:Support_gen.SLDPRT|supports]] for a more rigid mount, make sure to thread the holes in the top plate and the [[Media:Support_gen.SLDPRT|support]] at the same time with an M3 tap.
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File:Kinect mount1.jpg|Remove the sticky pad underneath the Kinect base.
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File:Kinect mount2.jpg|Remove 4 screws using a T0 bit in the big screwdriver.
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File:Kinect mount3.jpg|Using small phillips screwdriver remove 4 more screws.
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File:Kinect mount4.jpg|Carefully turning over the bottom metal plate shows the motor for the base, disconnect this.
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File:Kinect mount5.jpg|Cut a V shape hole through the plate closest to the sensor head with the heavy duty shears.  Be very careful of the cameras at this point since this is the most likely spot to damage the Kinect.
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File:Kinect mount6.jpg|This shows the completed V shape cutout.
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File:Kinect mount7.jpg|This should allow you to turn the top plate 90 degrees and slide it out.
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File:Kinect mount8.jpg|Try to loosen the two screws on either side with the small phillips screwdriver.  Don't worry if the screws get stripped at this point as there is another way to remove this part.
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File:Kinect mount9.jpg|This shows the other way to loosen the metal encasing.  Use a the small flat head or other similar tool to wedge underneath the metal encasing until you can grab it with the needle nose pliers.
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File:Kinect mount10.jpg|Bend the encasing back and forth with the needle nose pliers to fatigue it.  Doing this at both sides causes the encasing to fracture at the two screw heads.
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File:Kinect mount11.jpg|You should now be able to remove the collar piece with only the stem and Kinect sensor remaining.  It is probably wise to use some electrical tape on the two power cables coming down from the stem.  You should also remove the gear on the side of the stem and keep the screw that held it in place.
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File:Kinect mount12.jpg|The [[Media:top_gen.SLDPRT|top_piece]] can now be slid into place over the stem.
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File:Kinect mount13.jpg|Now turn the top piece 90 degrees, making sure the slot is facing towards the back of the sensor.
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File:Kinect mount14.jpg|Attach the [[Media:shaft_gen.SLDPRT|shaft]] piece using the small phillips screwdriver with the screw that held the original gear in place.
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File:Kinect supports.jpg|Attach a layer of double sided tape (any padding around 2-3 mm will do) to the [[Media:Support_gen.SLDPRT|supports]] leaving the paper on the side that is towards the Kinect.  This allows us to slide the [[Media:Support_gen.SLDPRT|supports]] into place and get a firm fit before attaching them to the [[Media:Top_gen.SLDPRT|top]] piece using M3 X 10 screws from the inside of the top.
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File:Kinect mount15.jpg|Assemble the top and bottom of the plastic mount.  Make sure to get the Kinect cable inside properly to relieve strain.  Then attach M4 screws to keep the case shut and the shaft and crank in place.
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</gallery>
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== Examples of Kinect Mounts at HRL ==
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[[Image:Cody_kinect2.jpg]]
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[[Image:Cody_kinect1.jpg]]
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Kinect mounted on our mobile manipulator Cody and a side view of the mount on a Robotis servo.
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[[Image:Playpen_kinect2.jpg]]
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[[Image:Playpen_kinect1.jpg]]
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Two views of the Kinect mount for our robot playpen for autonomous manipulation data capture.
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[[Image:Pr2_kinect.jpg]]
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Kinect mounted to the PR2 head.

Latest revision as of 11:58, 24 June 2011

Author

Marc Killpack (http://www.prism.gatech.edu/~mkillpack3, mkillpack3_at_gatech.edu), Advisor: Prof. Charlie Kemp

Use

After some basic steps to disassemble the base of the Kinect, we can use the mount described here to attach the Kinect sensor to a robot or other fixture (see examples below from HRL). If the intended purpose is for static use, there is a shaft that allows you to orient the Kinect plus or minus 30 degrees. If the purpose is to attach the Kinect to a moving part/robot, then we recommend the use of the supports as seen below in the instructions. We developed this as an alternative to having to open up the actual sensor casing and use its screw holes.

Making the Kinect Mount

We used a 3D printer to make our mount out of ABS plastic. The same parts could be machined out of metal if desired but would likely require some modifications to the tolerances and the thicknesses of some parts. The following sections list the necessary parts and explain the basic assembly of the mount from start to finish.

Solid Works Files

The main solid works files necessary for the mount are as follows:

The following files are examples of how we have modified the original to work for our robots:

Steps to Disassemble Kinect Base and Attach New Mount

Examples of Kinect Mounts at HRL

Cody kinect2.jpg Cody kinect1.jpg

Kinect mounted on our mobile manipulator Cody and a side view of the mount on a Robotis servo.

Playpen kinect2.jpg Playpen kinect1.jpg

Two views of the Kinect mount for our robot playpen for autonomous manipulation data capture.

Pr2 kinect.jpg

Kinect mounted to the PR2 head.